Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Report Abuse   |   Sign In   |   Register
Research Tips and SACSAworks
Share |

SACSAworks

SACSAworks is a new initiative from the Research Committee that allows members to share their research projects with each other. 

SACSA is dedicated to the professional development of practitioners, educators, and students engaged in the student affairs profession. It promotes opportunities for professional development; scholarship, research, and best practices; and understanding issues that impact students and the student affairs profession.

SACSAworks is a place where that opportunity is available! Members of SACSA can upload and share innovative programs, practices, projects, dissertations/theses, research, reports, videos, podcasts, vodcasts, publications, research tips, and slideshow presentations.  Our hope is that this repository will assist as well as provide knowledge and awareness to current and future student affairs professionals.

Expectations and Guidelines for SACSAworks: All work must be original and/or attributed to the original owner(s)/author(s) of the document. No work placed on this web site is to be for sale except articles published in the College Student Affairs Journal as part of a subscription to the journal. Materials available here reflect the views of the author and do not represent SACSA.

Submission Examples

Articles of Interest

External Confirmation of Adherence to Standards: As Applicable to Academic Programmes as to Business and Industry

Hughey, A.W. and Burke, M.G. (2010). External confirmation of adherence to standards: As applicable to academic programmes as to business and industry. Industry & Higher Education, 24 (4), 257-262.

The development of, and adherence to, performance standards is imperative for success in today’s competitive global market. This is as true for academic programmes in higher education as it is for the manufacturing and service sectors. Just like their counterparts in business and industry, it is important that graduate career preparation programmes are subject to an external validation process that can substantiate whether or not they are indeed following applicable standards. In this paper the authors discuss the current status of accreditation for graduate programmes designed to prepare tomorrow’s leaders in the student services profession and argue for the development of a new certification system based on the standards established by the US Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS).

PowerPoint Presentations

Supervising Former Peers (pdf)

Despite recognition of the important role supervision plays, it has received relatively little attention in student affairs research and literature (Stock-Ward & Javorek, 2003). Furthermore, the limited research on supervisory skills primarily deals with new supervisors and new supervisees, ignoring the concept of supervisors who are promoted within a department. Additionally, as stated by Schuh and Carlisle (1997), "few practitioners have received adequate preparation as supervisors” (Stock-Ward & Javorek, 2003). It is, however, evident that supervision can be challenging and that developing essential skills for supervision, which encompasses leadership and management, is a necessity for student affairs professionals to work effectively with others. 

Effective supervision can be challenging for any new manager who has been promoted. However, supervising people who used to be peers can be a touchy situation because so many things will change—job titles, duties, responsibilities and relationships inside and outside of the workplace (Chapman and McKnight, 2003). These changes create a unique kind of conflict that not only frustrates new supervisors, but also challenges their newly acquired authority and success. 

Implicit motives and negative responses can ultimately interfere with the organizational climate as well as the effectiveness of the new supervisor and the department. Therefore, it is imperative that new supervisors of former peers develop knowledge and confidence that will assist in confronting any potentially discordant attitudes and behaviors as well as engaging in conflict mediation within groups and between individuals.   Within a theoretical organizational leadership framework, broadly speaking, it is argued that the skills needed to solve organizational leadership problems include complex creative problem-solving skills associated with identifying problems, understanding the problem, and generating potential solutions; social judgment skills associated with the refinement of potential solutions and the creation of implementation frameworks within a complex organizational setting; and social skills associated with motivating and directing others during solution implementation. Application of each of these skill sets is associated with various forms of knowledge (Mumford et al, 2000). As such, it is beneficial for student affairs practitioners to be aware of implications and skills associated with supervising former peers and understand proven strategies for making the transition from co-worker to supervisor.

Scholarly Research

Dr. Joelle Davis Carter: Factors influencing the engagement of White undergraduates attending public historically Black universities.

Carter, J.D. (2010). Factors influencing the engagement of White undergraduates attending public historically Black universities. (Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. (Publication No. AAT 3443428).

Abstract/Summary

The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence the engagement of White, undergraduate students attending public HBCUs. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have experienced an increase in White, undergraduate student enrollment since the early 1980s (American Association of University Professors, 2007; Libarkin, 1984; Standley, 1978). Student engagement has been consistently linked to positive student outcomes such as cognitive and social development, college adjustment, and persistence rates (Berger & Milem, 1999; Cabrera, Nora, Terenzini, Pascarella & Hagedorn, 1999; Harper, 2004; Kuh, 1995; Pike, 2000). However relatively little is known about student engagement on HBCU campuses and even less is known about the engagement of non-Black students on HBCU campuses. HBCUs have been known for their ability to provide support resulting in academic success for African American students (DeSousa & Kuh, 1996; Fleming, 1984; Flowers & Pascarella, 1999), but little research has examined their ability in providing such support for other student populations, like White undergraduates. Thus, the primary research question guiding this study was: what factors influence the engagement of White, undergraduate students attending public HBCUs?

This qualitative multiple case study explored the experiences of 22 White undergraduate students attending two, public HBCUs, located in the mid-Atlantic and southeastern parts of the United States. While all the of the participants' experiences were unique and distinctive, the results from document analysis and individual and focus group interviews revealed five factors influenced their engagement: (1) faculty-student interactions, (2) staff-student interactions, (3) involvement in co-curricular activities and university-sponsored programs, (4) prior diversity experiences, and (5) first-year experiences. Based on these findings, recommendations for future research and practice are offered.

SACSA Dissertation of the Year (2010)

Dr. Matthew Clifford: Exploring mentoring experiences in college student affairs: A Q methodology study

Clifford, M.(2009). Exploring mentoring experiences in college student affairs: A Q methodology study. (Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database.(Publication No. AAT 3388786).

Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of new professionals in college student affairs as protégés in mentoring relationships. This study was designed as an exploratory study into the types of mentoring relationships that exist among college student affairs professionals, using Q methodology. The profession of college student affairs can use mentoring relationships to help recruit, train, develop, and retain high-quality individuals. Although mentoring relationships are frequently used to develop college student affairs professional, little is known about these relationships.

Fifty-five new professionals in college student affairs from 29 different states sorted 39 statements describing mentoring relationships on a continuum from "least like my mentoring relationship" (-4) to "most like my mentoring relationship" (+4). These 55 sorts were factor analyzed and rotated. Following these procedures, four factors emerged that represented different perspectives on mentoring relationships in college student affairs. Interpretation of these factors yielded distinct themes within them. These factors were named: (a) Mentor as Ideal, (b) Mentor as Cheerleader, (c) Mentor as Friend, and (d) Mentor as Teacher.

The results of the study, which intended to elicit the subjectivity of new college student affairs professionals regarding their mentoring relationships, suggest that college student affairs professionals value, in different ways, the interaction with their mentor. The results from this study suggest the personal interaction between a protégé and a mentor is a valuable part of a protégé's career. Additionally, the results from this study seem to indicate that mentoring relationships in college student affairs are, on balance, positive. The results also suggest that mentoring relationships in college student affairs are highly developmental. The perspectives described and the interpretation provided in this study can greatly assist student affairs professionals in the development of new professionals.

Video

Suicide: Facts, Figures, and How to Help: Produced by Ken Akers, Western Kentucky University (WKU’s TopSCHOLAR®)

Akers, K. (Producer). (2010). Suicide: Facts, figures, and how to help [video]. Available from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/cns_apps/4

Abstract

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students, in no small part due to all the life transitions occurring at one time (http://www.suicide.org/college-student-suicide.html). While many services are in place both on and off of most college campuses to prevent suicide and facilitate students seeking help, there is still a stigma attached to being suicidal and admitting that you need help. Creating awareness about suicide, the reasons people choose it, and the effects it has on others could work to help to remove that stigma and encourage those who are suicidal to take healthy steps.

In Memory of Ken Akers (January 27, 1985-January 22, 2011).

This video is a part of the pamphlet collection, Understanding Issues Related to Today’s College Student, compiled and produced by graduate students enrolled in CNS577 (Counseling Concepts and Applications for Student Affairs Professionals- Spring 2010 semester) at Western Kentucky University. The videos are designed to bring awareness, propose implications, and offer helpful advice regarding a variety of issues that could impact the emotional, physical and mental well-being of today’s college student.

Accompanying Brochure (select Download): Akers, K. (2010). Suicide: Facts, figures, and how to help [Brochure]. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/cns_apps/4

The Power of Words: Produced by Lauren Cunningham and Robin Rathje, Western Kentucky University(WKU’s TopSCHOLAR®)

Cunningham, L.D. and Rathje, R.R. (Producers). (2010). Hurt words [video]. Available from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/cns_apps/11

Abstract

"Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt." This statement is not true for many reasons and for many people. Students across campuses throughout the nation feel the sting of hate words that hurt daily. Counselors assist students suffering from depression and suicidal thoughts everyday that stems from the usage of these harmful words. Both the user and receiver of these hurtful words are affected. "Hurt Words" exposes these words for what they are, gives them meaning on a personal level, show the effects of harmful language and how students, faculty and staff can help stop those words from hurting more students.

This video is a part of the pamphlet collection, Understanding Issues Related to Today’s College Student, compiled and produced by graduate students enrolled in CNS577 (Counseling Concepts and Applications for Student Affairs Professionals- Spring 2010 semester) at Western Kentucky University. The videos are designed to bring awareness, propose implications, and offer helpful advice regarding a variety of issues that could impact the emotional, physical and mental well-being of today’s college student.

Podcasts/Vodcasts

The Importance of Ethics and the Protection of Students (Assessment)

http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/context/cns_assmt/article/1001/type/native/viewcontent

Kubicek, K. (Producer). (2010). The importance of ethics and the protection of students [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/cns_assmt/1

Submitted as a requirement for Assessment & Accountability in Student Affairs & Higher Education (CNS 610), Western Kentucky University.

Get this information on how to submit to SACSAworks and examples of submission types in a pdf here

Previous Dissertation of the Year Winners here.

Research Committee information here.

Previous Research Tips:

June 2010 Research Tip - Differentiating Between Research, Assessment and Program Evaluation

May 2010 Research Tip - Keep It Current

April 2010 Research Tip - The Research Journal: The Practical and Research-Based Benefits

February 2010 Research Tip - Back to the Basics 

January 2010 Research Tip - 10 Criteria for Good Educational Ethnographies

Community Search
Sign In


Forgot your password?

Haven't registered yet?

Calendar